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Tuesday, May 19, 2020 | History

1 edition of Evaluating selected protectants for shelled corn against stored-grain insects found in the catalog.

Evaluating selected protectants for shelled corn against stored-grain insects

D. W. La Hue

Evaluating selected protectants for shelled corn against stored-grain insects

by D. W. La Hue

  • 299 Want to read
  • 2 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Grain,
  • Storage,
  • Diseases and injuries,
  • Food storage pests,
  • Diseases and pests

  • Edition Notes

    Statement[Delmon W. La Hue and Edwin B. Dicke]
    SeriesMarketing research report -- no. 1058
    ContributionsDicke, Edwin B., United States. Agricultural Research Service
    The Physical Object
    Pagination9 p. ;
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25511548M
    OCLC/WorldCa2626567

    Use of Sprays and Protectants Fumigation of Stored Products 32 Fumigants Preparation for Fumigation Respiratory Protection Devices Fumigant Application Post Fumigation Commodities/Pests to Consider for Fumigation Fumigation Methods for Stored Grain 39 General Fumigation of Structures, Facilities and Other Enclosures 41 Types of Fumigants 45File Size: 1MB. The first line of defense against these invaders is placing grain into a clean bin. An important source of infestations in grain storage facilities is old grain that has been left in or around the bin. Even a small amount of grain can produce a large number of stored grain .

    The test insects were resistant to malathion and had been cultured in wheat or, in the case of T. castaneum, a 95% whole wheat flour +5% yeast mixture. The R. dominica, S. oryzae and T. castaneum strains had been selected for many years with fenitrothion to which they were resistant. Beetles were 1–3 wk old adults when used to begin by: High temperatures reduce the efficacy of grain protectants, allowing insects to multiply. Cooling of grain (below 15 degrees C) helps to suppress insect activity. Insecticides applied to uninfested grain will protect against pests developing and damaging the grain (for a specified duration).

    This book, Insect Pests of Stored Grain: Biology, Behavior, and Management Strategies, provides comprehensive coverage of stored product entomology for the sustainable management of insects and other noninsect pests, such as mites, birds, rodents, and fungi, with the aim to mitigate and eliminate these losses of food from grains.   Identifying insect pests in stored grain In a deregulated grain market, the popularity of on-farm storage continues to increase and markets are now more likely to request nil chemical residues. This reduces the tools available to control pests, so good storage hygiene, well-managed aeration and regular monitoring (at least monthly) are essential.


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Evaluating selected protectants for shelled corn against stored-grain insects by D. W. La Hue Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: La Hue, Delmon W. (Delmon William), Evaluating selected protectants for shelled corn against stored-grain insects.

Buy Candidate Protectants for Wheat Against Stored-Grain Insects (Classic Reprint) Books online at best prices in India by Delmon William La Hue from Buy Candidate Protectants for Wheat Against Stored-Grain Insects (Classic Reprint) online of India’s Largest Online Book Store, Only Genuine Products.

Lowest price and Replacement Guarantee. A common misunderstanding is that grain protectants kill insects already infesting the grain, but those types of products (contact disinfestants) are no longer available for on-farm use. In order to give protectants the best chance to defend stored grain, combine their use with meticulous storage hygiene practices before and after harvest.

Stored Product Pests. PURDUE EXTENSION. Direct-feeding damage by insects reduces grain weight, nutritional value, and germination of stored grain. Infestations. also cause contamination, odor, mold, and heat-damage problems that reduce the quality of the grain and may make it unfit for processing into food for humans or animals.

Com-File Size: KB. Stored Grain Insect Reference September Page 6 Granary Weevil The granary weevil, Sitophilus granarius (Linnaeus),1 is a small, moderately polished, blackish or chestnut-brown beetle (fig. 1A). The head emends into a long slender snout with a pair of stow.

Effectiveness of spinosad against seven major stored‐grain insects on corn Article in Insect Science 14(3) - June with Reads How we measure 'reads'. spinosad as a stored grain protectant. No referenced data on the efficacy of spinosad on corn in suppressing major stored-grain insects have been published.

In this paper, we evaluated the efficacy of spinosad against seven major stored-grain insects on shelled corn in the laboratory. corn and continues to breed after the corn has been harvested and placed in storage. This insect does not cause much damage to corn in storage, since the corn becomes too hard to be attractive.

It may, however, be very abundant locally in corn in Florida during the first 3 months of storage. This Size: 2MB. The Angoumois grain moth (AGM) can cause significant loss of crib-stored ear corn held for more than one year.

This insect is a primary stored grain pest because its immature (caterpillar) stages develop entirely within a grain kernel. While AGM can attack several grains, it is most often associated with ear corn and is rare in shelled corn.

THE MORE IMPORTANT INSECTS INJURIOUS TO STORED GRAIN. By F. CHITTENDEX, Assistant Entomologist, U. Department of Agriculture. After the graiu lias escaped the ravages of its many insect enemies in the field, and is harvested and in the bin, it is subject to the attack of insects of several species popularly known as weevils.

Temperature and moisture management of stored grain is vital. It is crucial that the grain mass temperature be reduced to 50 degrees F and the moisture is below percent soon after storage.

Colder temperatures will slow development of insects and inhibit molds, and extend insecticide residuals. Grain protectants and top dressing. A pocket reference that allows the non-specialist to identify major insect and arachnid pests found in stored cereal grains, grain products and grain legumes.

It describes most storage pests found worldwide and provides concise information on the biology, distribution, damage and economic importance of each species. Each entry contains at least one color photograph. iv K-State Research and Extension Table of Contents Grain Aeration Shlomo Navarro, Ronald T.

Noyes, Mark Casada, and Frank H. Arthur Insect-Resistant Packaging Michael A. Mullen, Jade M. Vardeman, and Jim Bagwell. destructive of all stored grain insects. The larvae develop inside kernels of whole grain in storage, thus making an infestation difficult to remove in the milling process.

In Indiana, the granary weevil is largely a pest of stored wheat, corn, and barley, especially in elevators, mills, and bulk storages. The adult cannot fly. It has been estimated that between one quarter and one third of the world grain crop is lost each year during storage.

Much of this is due to insect attack. In addition, grain which is not lost is severely reduced in quality by insect damage. Many grain pests preferentially eat out grain embryos, thereby reducing the protein content of feed grain and lowering the percentage of seeds which.

Evaluation of Malathion, Synergized Pyrethrum, and Diatomaceous Earth on Shelled Corn as Protectants Against Insects in Small Bins. USDA-ARS Mktg. Res.

Rpt. 10 pp. La Hue, D.W. Evaluation of Malathion, Synergized Pyrethrum, and a Diatomaceous Earth as Protectants Against Insects in Sorghum Grain in Small Bins. stored grain protectants against the maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais (Mots.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the tropics.

MATERIALS AND METHOD Culturing of insects: S. zeamais were obtained from infested stock of maize at Uyo main market, Nigeria. The insects were reared on whole maize in l glass jars after being treated for mites (Udo, ).Cited by: INTRODUCTION. Maize (Zea mays L.) is one of the major cereal crops produced worldwide (Blackie and Jones, ).It is a staple food in many countries throughout Africa, Latin America and Asia.

In Tanzania, maize is produced by smallholder farmers contributing about 80% of the total maize production in the country (Mdurma and Ngowi, ). A range of stored grain insects are becoming harder to kill with phosphine fumigations. Threatens exports, as phosphine may become ineffective against some pests.

Poor fumigation practices increase resistance (e.g. repeated fumigations in poorly sealed storages). strong phosphine resistance is also found in overseas Size: 2MB.

Although there are reports on the use of enhanced DEs (Wakil et al.,Wakil et al.,Riasat et al., ), little information is available on the simultaneous evaluation of such DEs as grain protectants on both parental adult mortality and progeny production of major stored-product insects.

In the present work, we evaluated the Cited by:. insects leaving the storage site and flying to grain standing in the field. They may also move to newly stored grain from fields and infested grain bins near-by. Insect populations can reach high levels when left unchecked in grain bins, subfloors, or aeration ducts, and in grain-moving equipment or discarded Size: 1MB.¢ A range of stored grain insects are becoming harder to kill with phosphine fumigations.

¢ Threatens exports, as phosphine may become ineffective against some pests. ¢ Poor fumigation practices increase resistance (e.g. repeated fumigations in unsealed or poorly sealed storages). resistance.In the Philippines, pirimiphos-methyl was found to be are effective protectant of corn grains against a variety of pests especially Sitophilus spp.

for 6 months. Pirimiphos is more persistent in maize than in sorghum. Pirimiphos methyl-impregnated sacks is more effective than malathion for the control of storage pests of shelled corn.